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This is how we use Clubhouse

Clubhouse is the most hyped social network right now. The audio-based app allows people from all around the world to come together to talk, listen and learn from each other in real-time. We have interviewed eight Swedish media insiders on their thoughts about the platform, here’s what they have to say.

David Orlic, Co-founder & CEO, Anyone

David is an award-winning creative director and five-time founder. In 2020, he co-founded Anyone – a voice app for five-minute advice that helps people make better calls.

Which has been your most positive experience on Clubhouse? 

— Since I’m building a product in the audio space, Anyone, it’s been exciting to see so many migrate from video and text to voice-based communication. Personally, Clubhouse has been great for reconnecting with a ton of people that I haven’t met for ages due to the pandemic. I’ve also moved my podcast to the platform and host a weekly wrap-up every Friday at 3 pm CET – the live format is so much fun. 

How often do you use Clubhouse right now? 

— Five weeks in, it’s by far the most active app on my phone. It’s more or less eliminated the mindless scrolling through feeds and brought the time spent in other apps down to near-zero. Weirdly, with Clubhouse on in the background, it feels like I don’t use my phone as much and get more work done throughout the day. 

Compared to other social media platforms, what is Clubhouses’ number one strength, and number one weakness? 

— They’ve done an incredible job in engineering scarcity: everything from the live content to the invite mechanics drives massive FOMO. As for weaknesses, I’d say it’s skewed towards a certain demographic that very much enjoys the sound of their own voice. 

Where do you see the future for brands on Clubhouse? Will we see brand-specific clubs and rooms? 

—Brands shouldn’t lead conversations, but they could definitely back the creators who do. I’m sure that we’ll see a lot of brand-supported clubs and rooms, led by talented individuals who manage to build large audiences around specific topics. 

How can brands make use of Clubhouse today? Should they be proactive and engage, or take a more backseat role and observe? 

— It’s a great opportunity to highlight the people behind the brand. Beyond the obvious benefits of a CEO or Creative Director engaging in discussions with customers, journalists and industry colleagues, I think that Clubhouse could be really useful for talent acquisition as well. 

Who is your most interesting follow on Clubhouse? 

— Amie Bramme Sey and Fanna Ndow are amazing.


Isabelle McAllister, content creator

Isabelle is a systemic change activist with a base in media and DIY. She is currently a host on the podcast Förnyarna. In the near future, Isabelle will be launching a new platform, as well as a book. 

Which has been your most positive experience on Clubhouse? 

— I think meeting people outside of my own bubble – hearing opinions from diverse people around the world, talking to younger age groups, as well as talking to people from different stages on the corporate ladder and celebrities. This weekend there was an almost 20-hour long conversation about humanistic capitalism on the app, which was really interesting. People from all over the world chipped in, and different moderators took turns seamlessly leading the way – even though nothing was pre-arranged. People came in and out during this time, as did I. (No I could not stay for the whole time, I do have a life IRL believe it or not.)

How often do you use Clubhouse right now? 

— Well, I’ve only been on it for 5 days so I’m testing it out, learning and making up my mind on how I will use it in the future. I don’t have notifications turned on for any apps on my phone which may be counterproductive now, in the beginning, since I have to check what’s going on in the app quite regularly. But it is interesting to see how the app is growing by the minute and how it evolves by this flood of new members.

Compared to other social media platforms, what is Clubhouses number one strength, and number one weakness?

— I would say that the ability to instantly interact is a strength. The platform allows for conversations rather than reactions, in comparison to Instagram posts of tweets. This makes the platform more equal and dynamic. Plus the transparency of being able to interact directly with your voice makes it feel more authentic than other platforms. The weakness is that, as always with big groups, it can be a bit messy without someone in charge. There is a need for a really specific topic and a good moderator for each room. As well as an easier way to find the rooms you want to be in, so that you don’t have to waste time on nonsense.

Where do you see the future for brands on Clubhouse? Will we see brand-specific clubs and rooms? 

— I believe that it is already happening, and I think that it is going to be even bigger in the future. I have been in conversations with publishers and others that I normally don’t really talk to, which I have really enjoyed. On the app, you have the ability to find a mutual interest and therefore have an easy discussion — something that most likely would not happen IRL. The thing to watch out for is probably people communicating as their “private selves” but actually speaking for their companies. That type of advertisement and infiltration is going to be hard to keep track of. But I guess it’s a great way for brands to communicate with their consumers. That is if you have something valid to say.

How can brands make use of Clubhouse today? Should they be proactive and engage, or take a more backseat role and observe? 

— My personal opinion is that the world would be a better place if brands listened more and took the backseat role. So that is my wish – that Clubhouse stays as a human connection platform, rather than yet another place to advertise things we don’t need…

Who is your most interesting follow on Clubhouse? 

— Malcolm Gladwell is always fun to listen to, Lina Thompsgård is always so smart and Anna Branten always finds a room with great insights. Thursdays at 11.30 me and some Swedish influencer are creating a weekly room about Influencers role in economics, how they are affecting people’s behaviors, greenwash and such, I hope see you there!

Charlie Lindström, Co-founder, CHIMI

Charlie is the co-founder and creative director of CHIMI eyewear. Together with Daniel Djurdevic, Charlie launched the company that is fast becoming one of Europe’s leading names in high-end fashion eyewear.

Which has been your most positive experience on Clubhouse? 

— My favourite experience so far has been when I stumbled across a room where people read notes from their phones. That was beautiful – people who didn’t know each other shared intimate and personal moments. Some read poems, some read texts that they never sent and some just read their to-do lists. 

How often do you use Clubhouse right now? 

— I’ve been very busy during the last couple of weeks, but I am definitely going to be more active on Clubhouse in the future. Sometimes at night when I’m working, I just attend to listen without interacting. 

Compared to other social media platforms, what is Clubhouses number one strength, and number one weakness? 

— Throughout the last couple of years, platforms like Instagram have made our attention span very short, and I believe that Clubhouse challenges that. Since it is not a visual platform, it has made our attention span grow again – I feel like people are more patient with each other on there. Clubhouse is all about the users. It creates a collective responsibility among the users – to make sure that people are included and no bullying or harassment is going on. And even though I have a lot of faith in mankind, I can’t help to be worried for the youth in that aspect. 

Where do you see the future for brands on Clubhouse? Will we see brand-specific clubs and rooms? 

— Even though I am a co-founder of a brand, I personally think it would be great to have a platform that is just for socializing and not for selling. 

Should they be proactive and engage, or take a more backseat role and observe? 

— As I said earlier, I would take the backseat.

Who is your most interesting follow on Clubhouse?

— The Swedish bachelor room.

Mia Kleregård, Service Management expert 

Mia can be found at the forefront of what is buzzing in the world. She carries over 25 years of international leadership experience and has held high-level positions in various companies.

Which has been your most positive experience on Clubhouse? 

— My most positive experience has been reconnecting with the people from my network in these strange times, to hear their voices and just hang out has genuinely meant the most. Not to forget the amazing dialogues with people from all over the world in all the shared, nerdy areas. It’s heaven for a person like me who is both curious and eager to learn from others. I don’t feel alone in my nerdiness any longer – I have found new global groups to connect with, in an authentic way.

How often do you use Clubhouse right now? 

— I host several rooms during the week, and I do a lot of research around different subjects to see what’s top of mind as well as just buzz through the worlds of this forum. I use Clubhouse instead of other social media platforms at the moment, so several times a day.

Compared to other social media platforms, what is Clubhouses number one strength, and number one weakness? 

— The number one strength is the authenticity and the freedom of speech – all happening in real-time and not recorded. This makes all of the other platforms look old, outdated and slow in my opinion. Every room has a possibility to create something unique together – share experiences, knowledge and challenges.

— I think that the freedom that the users feel today is also the biggest weakness and threat in the long run. It will be hard to maintain that freedom and creation. I think that it’s very important to already start discussing the future owner structure, so this early phase start-up doesn’t get sold to any big media/tech company or billionaire. That could make a lot of the freedom that we are able to experience today disappear, and a lot of data to be stored and sold. It would be amazing if it could be owned by the public, via crowdsourcing or similar. By the people, for the people. That would be uber cool.

Where do you see the future for brands on Clubhouse? Will we see brand-specific clubs and rooms?

— I think we will see brands on Clubhouse sooner than we think. The development is exponential. But I  don’t necessarily think that it is the right way to go. Right now, the app feels like an audio-Burning Man, and would love for that freedom to stay there – away from commercial interest, etc. Maybe an idea is to explore those principles as guidelines? There is really no limit to what we can create on this platform. Since we create this forum together, we all carry a responsibility for how we act and interact. 

How can brands make use of Clubhouse today? Should they be proactive and engage, or take a more backseat role and observe? 

— The most important thing to keep in mind is that each and every user on Clubhouse represents the company in real-time. It is more important than ever for companies to make the culture journey with well-founded values and a sustainable employee structure. Your employees are your brand ambassadors – both on Clubhouse and on other social media. 

— I don’t think any company regardless, can sit back and wait – we all need to be proactive and engage with the new. Especially the leaders in the industry, academia and in politics. We need to embrace the attitude of the technical youth – be first with the new and be curious. We are in for life-long learning, and the speed will just increase.  

Who is your most interesting follow on Clubhouse? 

— The more the merrier, I think that it’s the mix of the people that create the magic. It’s the sum of the dialogues and the people in the rooms that make the recipe. The stories shared and the depth of the engagement. The more people you follow the wider your perspective gets, it allows the user to truly experience the platform.

Love Bonnier, founder, 500 Stockholm

Love has a broad background in media and communications – everything from working with consulting in the field of communications to freelance writing for different platforms. In 2016 he founded the strategic communication firm 500 Stockholm.

Which has been your most positive experience on Clubhouse?

— The overall boundlessness. During the past week I’ve discussed recipes with Isabella Löwengrip and Victor Malm, debated politics with Romina Pourmokhtari, Lawen Redar and Nike Örbrink and trends with Caroline Ringskog Ferrada Noli. An experience similar to when Twitter was new, but hearing other voices also makes it more personal.

How often do you use Clubhouse right now?

— During the past week I’ve used it a few hours a day, maybe between one and three. But only once during office hours so far. Yesterday I deactivated notifications since it almost got stressful with all the talks going on that you could join. An intense experience in these days of isolation.

Compared to other social media platforms, what is Clubhouses number one strength, and number one weakness?

— The main strength is hearing other voices. You can laugh together, it promotes more nuanced discussions and build a stronger bond between you and the person you’re talking to. The other strength is that you see who’s listening in. This creates an interactive and dynamic environment where anyone can be invited to join the conversation, and where you as a speaker get a clearer view of the impact of the conversation in comparison to Twitter or Instagram, where the audience is anonymous outside of the story function.

Where do you see the future for brands on Clubhouse? Will we see brand-specific clubs and rooms?

— I think the platform has a huge potential for brands and businesses. I’m especially thinking for any company that markets themselves through thought leadership, and both business to business and employer branding comes quickly to mind. It might be hard to compete with Instagram for more visual products, but creative storytelling is essentially relevant for everyone if you use it right.

How can brands make use of Clubhouse today? Should they be proactive and engage, or take a more backseat role and observe?

— You shouldn’t wait too long if you are looking to build a presence on Clubhouse. If you engage now, in talks, host rooms and so on, that will come with a first mover advantage which generates a lot of attention. Of course that also opens you up for risks and potential criticism, but if you have a good idea for a discussion, a seminar or a story to reach out with, now is probably the time to move.

Who is your most interesting follow on Clubhouse?

— Casper Törnblom, David Orlic and Elsa Kugelberg.

Elin Häggberg, tech journalist and blogger

Elin is an expert in Swedish media on topics relating to tech, gadgets, social media and the digital world. She has a background in radio journalism and media- and communications studies.

Which has been your most positive experience on Clubhouse? 

— The openness and inclusion I experienced during my first days on the app. I was invited to speak and engage in rooms even though I didn’t know anyone from before. Everyone was curious and kind.

How often do you use Clubhouse right now? 

— 2-5 hours per day. I try to either be active during the morning, afternoon or evening and shut down during the rest of the day. I do check in during the day to see which rooms are active and who’s signed up for the app though.

Compared to other social media platforms, what is Clubhouses number one strength, and number one weakness? 

— The number one strength is how easy and fast it is to connect people in real conversation. The weakness is that it’s only available on iPhones.

Where do you see the future for brands on Clubhouse? Will we see brand-specific clubs and rooms? 

— I think brands will use Clubhouse best by either profiling employees on the app or collaborating with Clubhouse influencers. Then let them start sponsored rooms and conversations with interesting people around subjects that relate to the brand but doesn’t focus on selling or products. People are generally more interested in people than brands. 

How can brands make use of Clubhouse today? Should they be proactive and engage, or take a more backseat role and observe? 

— It’s important to listen in on your target audience and get a feel for the kind of conversations that are happening on the platform. Since it’s live and open a mistake can happen fast and be very damaging to the brands reputation. So observe first! And pay attention to profiles that are a good fit with your brand. Since Clubhouse is a new platform we will see new influencers and profiles rise. 

Who is your most interesting follow on Clubhouse? 

@jasmineyaya – she frequents a lot of different types of rooms and conversations and always adds value

Haisam Mohammed, founder and creative director, UNIFORM 

Haisam is the founder and creative director of UNIFORM – Scandinavia’s newest perfume house. With a passion for merging business and creativity, Haisam represents the new generation of entrepreneurs.

Which has been your most positive experience on Clubhouse? 

— The first phase of exploring topics that you normally don’t enter is a great thing about Clubhouse. I’m the type to jump around from one room to the other quite often just to hear a different perspective and I think because the interface is so seamless — the jump also becomes effortless.

How often do you use Clubhouse right now? 

— Waaay too often. I was actually stuck in a conversation on Clubhouse, and therefore I was late in getting back to you guys regarding this interview. If I would have to guess the number of hours, it would be between 3-5 hours a day. 

Compared to other social media platforms, what is Clubhouses number one strength, and number one weakness? 

— The number one strength for me has been the effortlessness to open the app and jump straight into a conversation. You absolutely don’t need a guide or an introduction to the app. 

—It is also extremely addictive. Not only for the audio experience but somehow you can’t put down the phone and just listen. I guarantee that the majority of people using the app are just sitting and staring at their phone, seeing who just joined the conversation. And that is also Clubhouse’s weakness – that it is too addictive. During this month that I have been on the app, I believe that my productivity has gone down severely. It has gone to the point now that I can’t have the notification on nor listen to any conversation while I’m at work. Many people have compared it to listings to a podcast, but for me, that has not been the case. I have not had the luck to combine working and being on Clubhouse — and there are many more people like me. 

Where do you see the future for brands on Clubhouse? Will we see brand-specific clubs and rooms? 

— This is something that I have thought about a lot, but I’m still not sure about my answer. I do believe that there will be a future for brands on Clubhouse but I’m more on into having e.g Emily Weiss of Glossier or Charaf Tajer of Casablanca having a conversation with their fans, rather than the brands Glossier or Casablanca. It will be a great place to have AMA with key-people from the brands to both establish a deeper relationship with their fans but also be a bit more humane. 

How can brands make use of Clubhouse today? Should they be proactive and engage, or take a more backseat role and observe? 

— For myself as a brand owner, I have taken a bit of a backseat to observe and find a way to talk about UNIFORM organically. Currently, it hass been in rooms where the conversation has been about beauty and skincare. But I have also had the opportunity to explain UNIFORM in more detail when people have invited me to introduce myself. I’m however in conversation about probably being the first brand-sponsor of a Clubhouse room. This is being made with the largest recurrent room on Swedish Clubhouse. I will let you know how that goes and what the effect is going to be.  

Who is your most interesting follow on Clubhouse? 

— The two people that come to mind are @paul_a, originator of the Clubhouse show called ”Parlamentet” where two teams will debate on obscure topics that he chooses. The other person is Doreen Ndagire, @sourwhiskey, who is setting up really hard and smart riddles for hundreds of people to join and try to figure out. 

Sara Garanty, Interior designer and visual artist

Sara is active within the sphere of interior design & visual art. She works with color psychology to make a positive change in the world, holding lectures and workshops, as well as working with commercial projects for different brands.  

Which has been your most positive experience on Clubhouse? 

— I have met so many new people in different age groups and backgrounds, outside my network. I am amazed by the great tips I’ve got so far – everything from how to market my business, how to create a good morning routine, how to be more creative during these times and how to be more honest with you partner and friends. There is something for everyone on Clubhouse. There are so many fun and interesting rooms, and so far I think people are more respectful than other social media. 

How often do you use Clubhouse right now? 

— Everyday. I listen to different rooms in the morning, during lunch and in the evening. It’s totally addictive. Clubhouse could not have entered the social media sphere at a better time, since we are living in times where you are not able to meet your friends as usual. 

Compared to other social media platforms, what is Clubhouses number one strength, and number one weakness? 

— A strength is that you get closer to people – you have to be more present, listen and be respectful, you can never go back to that same conversation again. A weakness is that you can never go back to that same conversation again…  

Where do you see the future for brands on Clubhouse? Will we see brand-specific clubs and rooms? 

— Absolutely, I think within my field, interior design, many brands will have their own rooms and talk about trends, colours, latest updates etc. within the field. 

How can brands make use of Clubhouse today? Should they be proactive and engage, or take a more backseat role and observe? 

— They can use it for connecting with their targeted audience and answer questions in a more relaxed way. I think it works different for different brands. 

Who is your most interesting follow on Clubhouse? 

— Alexander Morad, the creator of the Swedish room “Breakfast Club”.