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Klein Vision’s flying car is already taking to the sky, and it means business

Humanity’s mere vision of flying cars has been around just as long as actual cars have. Futuristic depictions from popular culture, (e.g. Blade Runner or The Jetsons), use the flying car as the ultimate sign of advanced times. Humans have unsuccessfully tried building flying cars since the early 1900s, but we’re edging closer with every try and every year.

Slovakian company Klein Vision has shown that this decade might be the decade where we finally reach the future. The AirCar (V5) is the latest version of a flying car, but it’s far from an advanced rendering or a concept vehicle — it is already spreading its wings. From the click of a button, the AirCar can transform from a road vehicle to an air vehicle (or vice versa) in less than three minutes.

Its maiden flight took place earlier this month with two takeoffs and landings, and the AirCar reached an altitude of 450 metres. The vehicle needs a takeoff distance of 300 meters and can travel 1000 kilometres whilst airborne. The two-seat model weighs 1100 kg and can carry an additional load of 200kg per flight. You do need a pilot’s license to fly the car, and Klein Vision has not stated yet if the vehicle is road permitted. Owner Professor Stefan Klein highlights that the car is still in the early stages of its development, but has a promising future ahead of itself.

— Following the completion of all required flight tests in compliance with EASA regulations, we will deliver a model with a certified ADEPT, 300HP engine within the next 6 next months, he said after the test flight.

Co-founder, pilot and investor Anton Kajac, fills in.

— With Aircar you will arrive at your destination without the hassle of getting a ride to the airport and passing through commercial security, you can drive your AirCar to the golf course, the office, the mall or your hotel and park it in a normal parking space, he said.

Watch the footage of the car transforming from a car to an aeroplane, and then back to its original form below.